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Sheffield Shield 2021-22 – James Pattinson suspended for hurling ball at Daniel Hughes

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Victoria quick handed a one-game suspension by Cricket Australia after throwing a ball in a “inappropriate and dangerous manner”

Fast bowler James Pattinson has been handed a one-game suspension for a code of conduct breach during Victoria’s Sheffield Shield win over New South Wales at the MCG.

During the final day, Pattinson fielded a ball in his follow through and threw it back at Blues batter Daniel Hughes who had not left his crease after playing a defensive stroke and showed no intent to take off for a run. Pattinson’s throw struck Hughes on the foot and left him in some discomfort.

Pattinson was immediately apologetic, although Hughes was clearly angered, but he was charged under Article 2.7 of CA’s code of conduct, “for throwing a ball at or near a player in an inappropriate and/or dangerous manner during a match.”

CA subsequently found Pattinson guilty of the level two breach on Wednesday. He has fined 100% of his match fee for the Shield game and also received one suspension point and meaning he is ineligible to play in Victoria’s one-day Marsh Cup match against NSW at the MCG on Friday. Pattinson has the right to appeal the decision.

It is the fourth time in four seasons Pattinson has been charged with code of conduct breaches and the second time he has been suspended for a level two breach in a Sheffield Shield game.

In 2019, he was suspended for personal abuse of a player after a verbal outburst at then Queensland bowler Cameron Gannon.
Pattinson was also fined 100% of his match fee and accepted the one-game suspension which meant he was ineligible to play in Australia’s first Test against Pakistan that summer. He would only play two Tests that summer which were the last of his nine-year Test career after he announced his retirement from international cricket last month.

Prior to the incident with Gannon, Pattinson had previously been found guilty of two level one code of conduct breaches for which he received a reprimand and a 100% match fee fine, the latter for showing dissent at the umpire’s decision in a Shield game against South Australia in 2018-19.

Pattinson’s is the sixth code of conduct charged handed out in men’s domestic cricket this season which have included Marnus Labuschagne (excessive appealing) and Cameron Green (dissent).



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Australia news – Cricket Tasmania furious at Cricket Australia’s treatment of Tim Paine

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Chairman Andrew Gaggin describes CA’s treatment of Paine as “appalling” and “the worst since Bill Lawry”

Cricket Tasmania chairman Andrew Gaggin has lashed out at Cricket Australia, describing their treatment of Tim Paine as “appalling” and “the worst” of any Australia captain in 50 years.
Gaggin released the statement on behalf of the Cricket Tasmania board on Tuesday, launching a withering attack on Cricket Australia’s handling of Paine in the aftermath of a texting scandal becoming public on Friday.
CA chairman Richard Freudenstein and CEO Nick Hockley admitted on Saturday they would have axed Paine as captain had they been in charge in 2018, despite Paine being investigated and cleared by CA’s integrity unit of wrongdoing regarding explicit and inappropriate text messages with a co-worker at Cricket Tasmania.

Gaggin teed off at CA, saying the Cricket Tasmania board unanimously expressed condemnation at how Paine had been treated since the texting scandal became public.

“In conversations I have had in recent days, it is clear the anger amongst the Tasmanian cricket community and general public is palpable,” Gaggin said in the statement.

“Tim Paine has been a beacon for Australian cricket over the past four years and instrumental in salvaging the reputation of the national team after the calamity of Cape Town. Yet, at a time when CA should have supported Tim, he was evidently regarded as dispensable. The treatment afforded to the Australian Test captain by CA has been appalling, and the worst since Bill Lawry 50 years ago.”

“The Cricket Tasmania Board reaffirmed its view that Paine should not have been put in a position where he felt the need to resign over an incident that was determined by an independent inquiry at the time to not be a breach of the Code of Conduct and was a consensual and private exchange that occurred between two mature adults and was not repeated.”

The statement concluded by saying that Cricket Tasmania would continue to support Paine and was pleased to see him take six catches on his return from injury for Tasmania’s second XI against South Australia. He missed out with the bat on day two of the four-day game, lasting just two balls as he was adjudged lbw to South Australia’s left-arm orthodox Sam Kerber for 1.
Gaggin’s statement echoed the words of former CA chairman David Peever who was equally critical of CA’s handling of Paine, saying he deserved loyalty at this time and not abandonment.

Alex Malcolm is an Associate Editor at ESPNcricinfo



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Ind vs NZ 2021 – Ross Taylor

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Ross Taylor is wary of New Zealand’s two-fold challenge: playing India in India, and carrying the weight of coming in as WTC champs

It’s been a “strange” five months for Ross Taylor. Since hitting the four that made New Zealand Test world champions on June 23, he has not played any cricket. Now, as he returns from his break to begin New Zealand’s next cycle in the World Test Championship, he knows things will likely get harder for them if anything. For one, they will not be flying under the radar but come in as the champions, and they have one of the toughest assignments in world cricket to kick things off: India in India.

“We can say we’re world champions now and that’s suddenly different, trying to retain it,” Taylor said. “It’s sort of a harder place to start. We started in Sri Lanka last time and we drew that series. It’s going to be a great two years I’m sure.”

New Zealand will be touring India, Pakistan and England in the current WTC cycle and will be playing Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and South Africa at home. In the previous cycle, they started with a drawn series in Sri Lanka but went on to lose 3-0 in Australia. They returned home to win against India, West Indies and Pakistan and became the first side to qualify for the final after Australia’s tour of South Africa was postponed over Covid-19 concerns.

Taylor believes experience will be key in overcoming the challenges of a series in India. “We’ve gone so many years as underdogs. But now coming in as champions: I guess the element of surprise is gone. But any time you play India at home you’re going to be the underdogs, whether you’re No. 1 in the world or where they sit in international cricket at the time. They are resting a couple of players but they’re still a formidable side and know these conditions really well.

“The way we adapt to these conditions is going to be the key going forward. Some of the guys have played many a time here before. We’ll be looking forward to hopefully use that experience to make things slightly easier but we know it’s going to be tough.”

Taylor had mixed feelings about his long break, acknowledging how crucial it is to get some game-time ahead of playing in Indian conditions. This time around even more so, as New Zealand have had to train without additional net bowlers due to Covid-19 restrictions.

“When you’re coming to India you want to play as much cricket as you want and can,” Taylor said. “Preparation so far has been fantastic. [But] it’s a little bit different having no net bowlers, you know, facing our [own] bowlers as preparation. It’s been key. I have been lining up to face spinners, they bowl a lot of overs. Normally you [also] get 10-15 overs of net bowlers of spin to practice. It is slightly different but it is what it is and it’s an interesting challenge both on the field and off it as well.”

Taylor has some experience playing Test cricket in the country, having been on tours in 2010, 2012 and 2016, and he has some ideas on how New Zealand can tackle India’s bowlers in these conditions.

“Obviously spin plays a major part. The new ball, it can do a bit but it can also be the easiest time to score sometimes. India have world-class spinners and know how to set batters up in these conditions. For us, it’s about been able to pick up the lengths as quick as possible and trust the defence.

“When there are a lot of men around the bat, it can be an intimidating place to start your innings but having said that… Getting through those first 10-20 balls is going to be crucial and it’s a bit of a cliche, but things do get easier. But no, it’s going to a big challenge for us, especially the batting unit.”

After the conclusion of the ongoing T20I series, which India has wrapped up with a game to spare, the first Test kicks off on November 25 in Kanpur followed by a second in Mumbai from December 3.

Sruthi Ravindranath is a sub-editor at ESPNcricinfo



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International Cricket Council news – ICC appoints Geoff Allardice full-time CEO

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He had served as the acting CEO for the last eight months, following the ICC’s issues with Manu Sawhney

Geoff Allardice has been named the full-time CEO of the ICC after serving in the role on an interim basis for more than eight months. Allardice had taken over the role from Manu Sawhney in March, when the latter was suspended based on the findings of a cultural review.
Allardice, a former first-class cricketer from Australia who has a degree in chemical engineering, earlier served as ICC general manager (cricket) for eight years. He did not play international cricket but was a prolific, dogged batter for Melbourne University in club cricket and played 18 matches for Victoria in the early 1990s. Former CA CEO James Sutherland was Allardice’s long-time Melbourne University team-mate. Eventually, Sutherland brought Allardice into the CA set-up as umpires’ manager in the early 2000s. From there, he went up the ladder to become CA’s cricket operations general manager, before moving on to the ICC in July 2012.

“My continued focus will be on doing the right thing for our sport and working closely with Members to deliver long-term success and sustainability,” Allardice said. “I would also like to thank the ICC staff for their commitment and support over the last eight months and I’m looking forward to continuing to serve cricket with such a talented team.”

Sawhney was first asked to go on leave by the ICC in March following issues that emerged over his management style after a cultural review, which was conducted by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC). He was then officially let go from his role in July, following a decision taken by the ICC board.

ICC chairman Greg Barclay said: “I am delighted that Geoff has agreed to take the role of ICC CEO on a permanent basis. He has shown tremendous leadership during an extremely challenging period culminating in the successful delivery of the ICC Men’s T20 World Cup 2021.

“Geoff has unrivaled knowledge of the global cricket landscape and its stakeholders and has consistently demonstrated he is the right person to work in partnership with our Members to shape the sport for the next decade as we embark on delivering a new strategy and our next commercial rights cycle.”



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