Connect with us

Cricket

T20 World Cup 2021 – Tymal Mills ruled out of T20 World Cup with thigh strain

Published

on


News

Cruel blow for left-arm quick as Reece Topley steps into England squad

Tymal Mills has been ruled out of the T20 World Cup, with Reece Topley taking his place in the 15-man squad.

Mills, England’s joint-highest wicket-taker in the tournament, left the field midway through his second over against Sri Lanka in Sharjah on Monday, immediately calling for a substitute fielder, Sam Billings, to replace him before heading straight to the dressing room.

He subsequently underwent a scan which confirmed a right thigh strain, a similar injury to the one he sustained in 2018, which also ruled him out of the rest of that English season.

It is a cruel blow for Mills, 29, who has been dogged by injury throughout his career – including a degenerative back condition that he feared would end his career prematurely and which led to him wearing a back brace for three months last winter after suffering a stress fracture. He subsequently tweeted that he was “gutted” to miss the rest of the campaign, but that he would do his utmost to fight back to fitness once more.

His appearances at the T20 World Cup had been his first for his country since February 2017, and came about after a long-term elbow injury to Jofra Archer had left England seeking a dependable white-ball quick to fill a massive gap in their plans.

Mills had started the tournament brightly with figures of 2 for 17 against West Indies and 3 for 27 against Bangladesh, and though he was more expensive against Australia and Sri Lanka, his pace, left-arm angle and ability to bowl through the middle and at the death helped him balance England’s attack. All told he has claimed seven wickets at 15.42 in his four matches, at an economy-rate of 8.00.

Mills’ absence left England short on death-bowling options against Sri Lanka, other than Chris Jordan, with Tom Curran the only unused squad member who bowls a high percentage of his overs at the end of an innings. Any of Curran, Mark Wood and David Willey could replace Mills in a straight swap, or England may consider rebalancing their side, leaving out a batter and bringing in two seamers to give them more options with the ball.

Topley, who has been in the UAE as a travelling reserve, will step up to the main squad immediately, and could be in contention to play in England’s final group game against South Africa. He too has been plagued by injuries since his appearance at the last T20 World Cup in 2016, but his pace and left-arm angle replicates that of Mills, and gives England another pace option to go alongside the existing alternatives.





Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Cricket

SL vs WI, 2nd Test

Published

on


News

West Indies captain wants his batters to ‘be clear about whether you’re playing forward or back’

Defend a lot. Be clear on whether you’re playing back or forward. And stick around for a couple of sessions. This is West Indies’ batting game-plan for the second Test according to captain Kraigg Brathwaite.

With the surface for the second Test expected to be even more spin-friendly than the first, West Indies’ batters technique and application seems set for another major examination.

“The plan is to be clear in what you want to do. Believe that you can do it, and do it for long periods,” Brathwaite said. “We’ve got to have the discipline and the fight to do it for 50 overs – more than two sessions, or three sessions.

“We had a lot of discussions. One important thing is that you’ve got to defend a lot of balls. Having a straight bat is one thing we discussed.  That’s very important. And sweeping as well – especially the offspinner. It’s just about being clear and confident about whether you’re playing forward or back.”

West Indies’ only half-centurions in the first Test were Nkrumah Bonner and Joshua da Silva, who put up a 100-run stand in the second innings, rescuing the side from 18 for 6. Brathwaite said the remainder of the batters had drawn inspiration from that partnership.

“Bonner and Josh showed that when you have a solid defence, if you put the effort and energy in, you’ll be successful. Sometimes when doubt comes in, you can slip up a bit. Just trust that defence. When the bad balls come you get runs. It’s important to have that clarity, as to what you want to do here.

“In terms of how they were able to manoeuvre different balls, they were a very good example for us. As a batting group, it was good to see, and something to learn from.”

West Indies have had a mixed 2021. They began with an excellent 2-0 victory in Bangladesh, before drawing two Tests at home against Sri Lanka. Their worst series was the 2-0 defeat at South Africa’s hands at home, before drawing a home series against Pakistan 1-1. Brathwaite outlined the importance of the next match: if they beat Sri Lanka, they would have won more matches in 2021 than they’ve lost.

“To be honest we showed good progress in 2021. It was not a good series against South Africa, but we bounced back decent against Pakistan. In Bangladesh we won that series 2-0. Winning this game will be very crucial from a points perspective for the Test Championship. As a team we’ve made some strides. Once the group stays together and keeps building, that’s crucial.”

Andrew Fidel Fernando is ESPNcricinfo’s Sri Lanka correspondent. @afidelf



Source link

Continue Reading

Cricket

Luke Ronchi: 'Pitch holding up better than expected'

Published

on



New Zealand batting coach disappointed with Young’s lbw dismissal, but still hopeful of a positive result



Source link

Continue Reading

Cricket

Ind vs NZ, 1st Test – Vikram Rathour

Published

on


News

India’s batting coach throws his weight behind the two under-fire “senior cricketers”

Shreyas Iyer’s century and fifty in his debut Test, the only time an Indian batter has done so, has turned the spotlight squarely on Ajinkya Rahane and Cheteshwar Pujara as full-time captain Virat Kohli returns for the Mumbai Test next week. India’s batting coach, Vikram Rathour, however, has thrown his weight behind the two veteran batters without giving any hints into whether Iyer will be retained for the next Test.

Rathour was specifically asked about how much of a concern the returns from the “two senior cricketers” have been. “Of course we want our top order to contribute, but the cricketers you mentioned have played 80 and 90 Test matches so they have the experience,” Rathour said. “Of course to play that many games they must have done well for us. I understand both of them are going through a lean phase but they have played very very important knocks for us in the past, and we are pretty sure they will come back and play more important knocks for our team in the future as well.”

Rahane now averages 24.39 over his last 16 Tests, including one century in the Boxing Day Test. With scores of 35 and 4 in this Test, his career average has now dipped below 40. At home he averages 35.73.

In 23 Tests since the 2018-19 tour of Australia, Pujara has not scored a century and has averaged 28.61. He has played important supporting knocks in Australia and in England, but has never regained the fluency of his batting, which shows in a strike-rate of 36.1 over the period. Pujara managed 26 and 22 in this Test.

At one stage, India were 51 for 5, an overall lead of 100 on a surface both teams feel hasn’t deteriorated as much as you expect pitches in India to do. From the precarious situation, India were helped by the slowness of the pitch and the absence of a menacing spinner who could follow up on the good work done by the two seam bowlers.

Iyer and Wriddhiman Saha took India to safety before India practically batted New Zealand out of the game. Had India been struggling in the Test, the scrutiny on Pujara and Rahane would have been more intense. Still Rathour was asked how many Tests can be given even to proven performers if the runs are not coming.

“I don’t think we can put a number to that,” Rathour said. “That really depends on the situation the team is in, and what the team requires.”

So what happens when Kohli comes back? “The captain coming back in will happen in Mumbai, I understand,” Rathour said. “We will get to that point when we reach Mumbai. At this point we are focused on this game. There is still a day to go, and a game to be won. So we are really focused on this game.”

At least can you confirm Iyer will play the next Test? “That decision we will take when we land in Mumbai,” Rathour said.

These are of course difficult decisions to make, but a team management would rather players outside the XI keep those in under pressure than there not being enough alternatives. A similar situation is brewing in the wicketkeeping department, but there Rathour confirmed Rishabh Pant takes over when he comes back.

“Unfortunately for Wriddhi, we have an extremely special player, Rishabh Pant, who is the No. 1 keeper for the team, who has done extremely well for us in the past two years,” Rathour said. “That’s the role Wriddhi has at the moment. He is there whenever we need him. Whenever Pant is not there. Again he showed today with the knock he played today that how important he is and how good he is.”

However, you can’t be so sure about even that role for Saha, who is 37 now and didn’t complete two of his three overseas tours either through injury or lack of batting capability. Even though he overcame a stiff neck to score a fighting fifty that helped take India to safety in Kanpur, his absence behind the wicket opened the door for a younger contender, KS Bharat, who was impressive with his keeping, taking effecting three extremely difficult dismissals on a pitch with up-and-down bounce.

It will not be unreasonable to look at the future now and slot Bharat in as the back-up to Pant. If Saha is fit and ready come Mumbai, that will be another happy headache for the team management.

Sidharth Monga is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending