Connect with us

MLB

Lance McCullers’ status remains uncertain as Houston Astros’ roster decisions loom ahead of ALCS

Published

on

HOUSTON — The Houston Astros aren’t counting out Lance McCullers Jr. for the ALCS just yet, but his status for the series is in doubt after the right-hander underwent an MRI on his pitching arm.

“He’s still being examined,” Astros general manager James Click said Thursday, one day before Houston hosts the Boston Red Sox in Game 1. “Just going to keep looking at him, see how he is.”

McCullers left Game 4 of the ALDS against the Chicago White Sox on Tuesday with forearm tightness but didn’t think at the time that the injury was serious.

“I just started getting tight at the beginning of the inning,” McCullers said after the game. “I just told them, ‘Listen, I’m not 100 percent.'”

Houston has until 10 a.m. local time Friday to set its ALCS roster.

“Any time you have a pitcher come out with forearm anything, you want to take your precautions and make sure you know exactly what’s going on,” Click said.

Astros manager Dusty Baker indicated that McCuller’s roster spot could be filled by veteran right-hander Jake Odorizzi, who was left off the roster for the ALDS.

Baker also announced Thursday that left-hander Framber Valdez will start Game 1 and rookie Luis Garcia will get the ball Saturday for Game 2.

“I know that I’ve worked really hard to be able to have the results that I have and be able to have the performances that I have, and it means a lot that they have the confidence in me to be a starter for tomorrow [Friday],” Valdez said through an interpreter.

The outlook for outfielder Jake Meyers is a little better, as he took to the practice field Thursday for the first time since injuring his left shoulder in Game 4 while attempting to make a leaping catch at the wall.

“I’m feeling good,” Meyers said. “I’m feeling a lot better — doing rehab and stuff like that to get it stronger.”

Asked whether he would be available to play if needed, Meyers answered “yes.”

As with McCullers, however, Baker was holding off on any roster decision on Meyers.

“We’re not sure about that either,” Baker said. “I’ve got to talk to the trainers afterwards, see how he came out of it today [Thursday].”

Source link

MLB

Travis Snider retires after 8 big league seasons

Published

on

Travis Snider says he has retired after eight major league seasons.

“I have contemplated this day for for a while but the time has finally come for me to hang up the spikes,” he wrote Thursday on Instagram. “I have spent many waking hours and sleepless nights trying to find a way back to the show. How to fix my swing. How to be a better teammate and a leader. What I have learned through those experiences is what gives me the confidence in this transition to becoming a ‘former player.'”

Snider, who turns 34 on Feb. 2, last played in the major leagues in 2015 with Pittsburgh. He spent last season with the Atlanta Braves‘ Triple-A farm team at Gwinnett and hit .174 with four home runs and 15 RBIs in 138 at-bats.

Snider was the 14th overall pick by the Blue Jays in the 2006 amateur draft. He had a .244 average with 54 homers and 212 RBIs for Toronto (2008-12), Pittsburgh (2012-15) and Baltimore (2015).



Source link

Continue Reading

MLB

Top 10 at each outfield spot: It's still Trout in center, but who leads in right — baseball's most stacked position?

Published

on


Soto? Acuña? Betts? Judge? Harper? Buster Olney rates MLB’s best across the outfield for 2022.

Source link

Continue Reading

MLB

Keith Hernandez stunned by New York Mets jersey retirement news

Published

on

While the magnitude of having his number being retired by the New York Mets is “sinking in,” Keith Hernandez can only wonder if the Hall of Fame could still be in his future after falling off the ballot in 2004 after nine years.

Hernandez, a captain and commentator beloved in Queens for nearly four decades, on Wednesday said he was caught “completely by surprise” by Mets owner Steve Cohen on Tuesday when he was informed that the franchise would be retiring his No. 17 on July 9.

“He dropped the bomb on me,” the 68-year-old Hernandez said of becoming just the fourth Mets player to have his number retired. “Caught me completely by surprise.”

“I had no idea. It’s just kind of soaking in and sinking in now, today, the import of this. It is really, to think of it, I’m so honored. This is the highest honor that an organization can give to a player.”

The five-time All-Star was on the Baseball Writers’ Association of America Hall of Fame ballot from 1996 to 2004, but he never got more than 10.8% of the vote, well short of the 75% threshold for enshrinement.

Baseball’s analytics wave, however, has shined a fresh light on his talents. In particular, his .386 on-base percentage went underappreciated during his career, but through a modern lens, he compares well to others in the Hall.

It’s possible Hernandez may find his way to Cooperstown yet via an era committee vote, and this recognition from the Mets could help.

“The number retiring is something that is enormously significant, and such an honor,” Hernandez said. “Whether it turns into me getting consideration for that down the road, we’ll have to wait and see.”

Hernandez’ No. 17 will stand alongside Tom Seaver’s 41, Mike Piazza’s 31 and Jerry Koosman’s 36 at Citi Field. Managers Gil Hodges (14) and Casey Stengel (37) have also had their numbers retired.

“You know, I grew up as a kid like everybody else, going to baseball games, and going to some of those parks with the names up on the wall,” Hernandez said. “This is unbelievable.

“I don’t think bewilderment is the right term, but I do feel like I’m lost in space that this happened to me, an honor like this. It’s something I never dreamed of. You dream of being on a world championship team, you dream of being a batting champion or an MVP. The thought of having a number retired, I can tell you never crossed my mind as a kid growing up.”

Hernandez was inducted into the Mets Hall of Fame in 1997 and also joined the St. Louis Cardinals‘ Hall last year. He ranks second in Mets history with a .297 batting average, and he won a team-record six of his 11 Gold Gloves in New York.

A fan favorite who parlayed his success into appearances on “Seinfeld” and elsewhere, Hernandez joined the Mets broadcast booth in 1999 and has won three Emmys for Best Sports Analyst.

“He just brought a winning culture,” former teammate and current TV partner Ron Darling said. “In the way he moved, the way he acted and the way he played. The one thing I think Keith did for that entire ballclub, he was not a rah-rah guy, he was not a guy who said a lot in that clubhouse, but he brought it every night.”

Fourteen players have worn No. 17 since Hernandez left New York, but none since Fernando Tatis in 2010. Hernandez retired in 1990, and the next year, ace David Cone wore it to commemorate Hernandez’s career.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending