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Recent Match Report – Warwickshire vs Notts Group 1 2021

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Michael Burgess resists after Nottinghamshire find route through middle-order

Warwickshire 341 (Rhodes 91, Lamb 67, Paterson 5-90) and 201 for 6 (Rhodes 63, Burgess 61*, Chappell 3-53) lead Nottinghamshire 297 (Slater 77, Clarke 61, Norwell 4-64) by 245 runs

There were eyebrows raised at the start of the 2018 season when several counties, among them some of the biggest in the game, became embroiled in something of a bidding war for the services of Zak Chappell.

To some extent you can understand it, too. At the start of that season, Chappell had played 10 first-class games and claimed just 15 wickets at an average in excess of 50. Only towards the end of his time at Leicestershire, with the sharks circling and his departure all but guaranteed, did he pick up 16 wickets in three matches.

He didn’t make the most overwhelming start at Nottinghamshire, either. In that first season there, in 2019, he played three Championship matches across six months and didn’t take a wicket in any of them. You could probably forgive their supporters – or the likes of Luke Wood, who was eventually obliged to move on to gain more regular first team opportunities – for wondering what all the fuss was about.

But there’s something there. Something that isn’t always nurtured on the sluggish wickets on which modern Championship wicket – played in the margins of the season, as it is – is played. But something a bit special nevertheless.

He showed it here. If the wicket of Pieter Malan, slapping a short ball to cover, was unremarkable, his next two wickets were testament to rare skill. First Sam Hain edged one which was angled in but then bounced and left him – a beautiful delivery, by any standards – before Will Rhodes was bowled by a full one that pitched outside leg and swung deliciously late to take his off bail. He had already had Rhodes, on five, edging to slip. It was unclear whether the ball carried to Haseeb Hameed. Rhodes, who came into this game having not made a half-century this season, went on to make his second of the match. He looked in fine touch.

Clearly one decent spell of bowling from Chappell doesn’t make a season. And clearly his first-class bowling average for Nottinghamshire heading into this game – 47.27 – isn’t adequate. But when pitches are flat and batters are set, it is bowlers like Chappell, with his height, his pace and his skill combining, at his best, to offer a compelling package, who can make the difference.



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Ban vs Aus, 2021 – Russell Domingo

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Bangladesh head coach says he does not expect big turning tracks in his side’s bid to register their first T20I series win over Australia

Bangladesh are looking for their first-ever T20I series win against Australia, but they won’t resort to big turners in order to achieve this. Head coach Russell Domingo said as much ahead of the upcoming five-match assignment in Dhaka, pointing out that it’s important to “play on good wickets” in the lead-up to the T20 World Cup in the UAE.

“Obviously, winning is always important,” Domingo said. “It’s a great opportunity for us to try and win a series against Australia; it will do wonders for our confidence. We also want to try and find our best combination [for the T20 World Cup], and playing against Australia will give us that opportunity.”

“Bangladesh don’t play against Australia that often, so this is a big series for us and we’re determined to do well in it.”

The two teams have only ever faced each other four times in T20Is, with Australia commanding a 4-0 lead in the head-to-head. The only occasion when Bangladesh hosted Australia in the shortest format, prior to this series that kicks off on August 3, was in April 2014.



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Ban vs Aus, 2021 – Ashton Turner hopes return to bowling will boost T20 World Cup chances

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He hopes for more opportunity with the ball during the five-match T20I series in Bangladesh

Ashton Turner hopes a return to the bowling crease will boost his chances of being part of Australia’s T20 World Cup squad.
Turner has undergone multiple shoulder operations during his career, the most recent two years ago, and has rarely been seen with the ball. However, across the last two ODIs in West Indies he sent down 14 overs, claiming two wickets and impressing with his control.
It was the most he had bowled since the end of 2016-17 Australian domestic season when he delivered 41 overs in a Sheffield Shield match against New South Wales.

He now hopes for more opportunity with the ball during the five-match T20I series in Bangladesh, starting on Tuesday, which is a final chance to impress the selectors before the World Cup squad is named.

“Bowling is something I’ve always loved and unfortunately due to my shoulder injuries I haven’t been able to contribute much in games,” he said. “It’s been almost two years since my last operation, so I feel as good about my bowling as I have in a long time.

“Although I haven’t been able to bowl a lot in games, behind the scenes I’ve been working a lot at training and it’s nice in conditions that suited spin bowling and to be another option for the captain. Hoping that my bowling workloads can increase from here.

“Don’t think I’ve bowled eight overs in a game for more than four years…no doubt that will take some time. Feel like I’ve done everything I can over the recent periods and I’m starting to enjoy it as much as I used to.”

Having a second string could be a deciding factor in selection although Turner’s primary job will remain with the bat. He is seen as one of the players who could be Australia’s finisher but he only played twice in the recent T20I series against the West Indies. His best innings came in the first ODI when he made 49 while the performance that put him on the map internationally was his 84 off 43 balls against India in Mohali in 2019.

To date, he has made 87 runs from 89 balls across nine T20I innings. The 22 balls he faced in the third ODI in St Lucia is the most he has managed in a single game, in a position where the demands are often for instant results very quickly, but he believes his role in domestic cricket for Perth Scorchers stands him in good stead.

“There’s no secret until you’ve been able to walk out in high-pressure situations and perform, training can’t replicate that pressure,” he said. “I’m fortunate that for a number of years now I’ve been able to experience some close games in the middle order and try to finish innings. With that experience, comes confidence and that’s not something that can be found at training.”

In the West Indies, he also took the chance to pick the brains of Andre Russell who is a master of the closing overs and has also lent on the recalled Dan Christian in the Australian dressing room.

‘[Speaking to] Andre Russell on the back of the West Indies tour, being able to get some insights from him about how he goes about his game. He’s probably the best in the world at the moment at finishing innings and he’s another one playing T20 cricket only,” Turner said. “The message coming from Andre is that he’s trying to replicate the situations he has in games and challenge him as much as possible.

“Dan Christian is someone I’ve played a lot of cricket with but not necessarily spent a lot of time in the same dressing. So I have spoken to him about his transition from playing all formats of the game to now plying his trade as one of the best middle-order finishers in the domestic circuit. It’s interesting to see a change in his philosophy around batting and how he models his training and that’s certainly evolved over the last five years.”

The five-match T20I series against Bangladesh that begins on Tuesday will be played across seven days in Dhaka. Australia are expected to be captained by Matthew Wade in the absence of Aaron Finch who has returned home with a knee injury.

Andrew McGlashan is a deputy editor at ESPNcricinfo



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Australia selector George Bailey and his pressing tasks in the next 12 months

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New selection chief will play a key role in picking squads for the T20 World Cup and Ashes

While selectors can’t score the runs or take the wickets, they do have to make the final decision on who is best placed to do so. George Bailey, Australia’s new chairman of selectors, faces a number of big judgement calls over the next 12 months that will go a long way to defining this era of the men’s team.

A team to win the T20 World Cup

It is a trophy Australia’s men’s team have never won (they will have two chances in the space of a year) and preparations for this year’s edition have been far from ideal, with the current squad in the West Indies and Bangladesh stripped of a host of key names. However, in Bailey, they have someone very much in touch with the format – he has captained Australia in 28 of his 30 T20Is and played in the BBL as recently as the 2019-2020 season. The upcoming five games in Bangladesh are a last chance for the fringe candidates to impress Bailey, who will hope he has a full hand of players to select from for the final squad. If everyone is fit and available (captain Aaron Finch will shortly have knee surgery), the key decisions will be who fills the middle-order roles and who takes the wicketkeeping gloves.

Test batting spots

Test cricket has been thin on the ground for Australia during the pandemic and there will be a lot of people with fingers crossed that the Ashes goes ahead as scheduled. Last season’s 2-1 loss to an injury-hit India left a number of question marks with the list of central contracts announced earlier this year highlighting the uncertainty over the batting. As it stands, there is at least an opener and a No. 5 needed, presuming the other spots are filled by David Warner, Steven Smith, Marnus Labuschagne and Cameron Green. With Warner being 34, it could also be that it is under Bailey’s watch that his career draws to a close.



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