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Minnesota Twins non-tender Eddie Rosario

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MINNEAPOLIS — The Minnesota Twins declined Wednesday to offer a 2021 contract to Eddie Rosario, their regular left fielder for the past six seasons.

The Twins also decided to non-tender reliever Matt Wisler prior to MLB’s deadline. They reached one-year deals with five of their arbitration-eligible players: Jose Berrios ($500,000 signing bonus and $5.6 million salary), center fielder Byron Buxton ($5,125,000), reliever Tyler Duffey ($2.2 million), catcher Mitch Garver ($1,875,000) and reliever Caleb Thielbar ($650,000).

Rosario cleared waivers this week, another sign of the economic uncertainty around the industry.

“We very much appreciate everything Eddie has done up to this point. He’s been a big part of this team over the last number of years. So those are always difficult decisions. But he was a pro about it,” president of baseball operations Derek Falvey said.

Though Rosario and Wisler were the only players on the 40-man roster not offered new contracts, Falvey said the team remains open to negotiating with them as free agents.

The 29-year-old Rosario made $7.75 million last season, batting .257 with 13 homers and 42 RBI with a .792 OPS in 57 games. He hit a career-high 32 homers with 109 RBI in 2019 and was voted the team’s most valuable player in 2018, but the club’s top prospects are in the outfield. Alex Kirilloff, a 2016 first-round draft pick, is likely ready for an everyday role after landing on the postseason roster. Brent Rooker and Trevor Larnach are close behind.

Rosario, who was eligible for his third and final year of arbitration that likely would have driven his salary over $10 million, became a free agent one season early. With the pandemic putting the squeeze on revenues and payrolls, Rosario, whose career on-base percentage is just .310, was a logical candidate to non-tender.

Wisler was a waiver claim success story for the Twins, posting a 1.07 ERA with 35 strikeouts in 25 1/3 innings after splitting the 2019 season with San Diego and Seattle. He made $725,000 in 2020.

The moves left only one player in the salary arbitration eligibility pool, closer Taylor Rogers, with two more months to reach an agreement before the Twins would be forced to go to a hearing. Rogers took a step back this season, compiling a 4.05 ERA in 21 appearances with nine saves and two blown chances. He made $4.45 million in 2020, after notching 30 saves with 90 strikeouts over 69 innings in 2019.

Berrios, a two-time All-Star, had a 4.00 ERA in 12 starts during the 60-game season to help the Twins win their second straight AL Central title. He made $4,025,000 in 2020.

Buxton battled injuries again but posted a career-best .844 OPS, with 13 homers in 39 games while providing elite defense in center field. He made $3,075,000 in 2020.

Duffey, who turns 30 on Dec. 27, had a career-best 1.88 ERA in 24 innings this year with 13 hits allowed and 31 strikeouts. Over the last two years, the right-hander has been a key late-game cog in Minnesota’s bullpen, logging a 2.31 ERA and 113 strikeouts over 81 2/3 innings with 57 hits allowed. He made $1.2 million in 2020.

Garver and Thielbar entered their first year of arbitration eligibility. After a breakout 2019 season with 31 homers in 93 games, Garver slumped in 2020 and spent much of the summer on the injured list.

In addition to Rosario and Wisler, the Twins have a long list of notable free agents: designated hitter Nelson Cruz, starting pitchers Jake Odorizzi and Rich Hill, multi-positional player Marwin Gonzalez, relievers Sergio Romo and Tyler Clippard, and backup catcher Alex Avila. Relief pitcher Trevor May signed with the New York Mets.

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Pitcher Corey Kluber hopes bullpen session shows he’s healthy after 2 lost seasons

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Free agent Corey Kluber is out to prove he’s healthy, as the right-hander prepares for a bullpen session in front of major league teams on Wednesday in Florida. The two time Cy Young winner has pitched in just eight games over the last two seasons but says his injuries are a thing of the past.

“I don’t have a mindset that I need to prove myself to anyone, so to speak,” the 34 year-old said in a phone interview recently. “I just need to show people that I’m healthy. I’m not putting pressure on myself to go out there and do X, Y and Z. It’s just about showing teams I’m progressing through a normal offseason.”

The 25-30 pitch tryout in front of scouts from about two thirds of MLB teams is necessary for Kluber after three separate injuries helped sideline him over the past two years. He fractured his arm after getting hit by a line drive in a game early in 2019, then was shut down during his rehab due to an abdominal injury. The latest ailment may have been the most frustrating, as Kluber missed all but one inning for the Texas Rangers in 2020 after experiencing a muscle issue in the back of his throwing shoulder. His season ended just as baseball was returning.

“Jumping from intra-squad to a game that matters, probably had something to do with it,” Kluber said.

It was a classic pandemic-related injury. Kluber lives in Massachusetts, so when spring training was halted in mid-March, he wasn’t exactly sure how to continue his preparation. Throwing against a fence — which is how Kluber kept up his arm strength at first — isn’t exactly the ideal way to stay ready. Like all players, his normal routine came to a halt.

“I don’t think anyone was really prepared to figure out how to train in that environment,” Kluber stated. “Now, having gone through it, I think I have a better idea of how to get the work you need in. It helps to have Eric’s place in Massachusetts and in Florida.”

Eric is Eric Cressey, pitching guru to a handful of major league baseball players. But his training facility in Massachusetts was closed early on in the pandemic. It’s why heading to Florida, where there are fewer restrictions, has been helpful for Kluber and other pitchers. Cressey’s Florida facility will be where Kluber’s bullpen session for scouts will take place.

“No one had a lot of access to sports medicine resources or hands-on manual therapy or gyms and stuff,” Cressey said of the shutdown. “Had this been a longer season he could have come back if the Rangers had been in the mix.”

Kluber added: “If we had done this (the tryout) in a state like Massachusetts, where I live, it probably would have been more difficult.”

Kluber was already trying to find his best form after the injuries in 2019. Even before the broken arm, his delivery was off, leading to some struggles and a higher than usual ERA (5.80) that season, even though it was compiled in only seven starts. It’s why he was excited for 2020 despite the awkward training routine during the shutdown.

“My low moment was after that first inning in Texas just because I had spent over a year working my butt off to get to that point,” he said. “One of the things I wanted to make sure that I did while I was hurt (in 2019) was piece together that puzzle and what had gone sideways and how do I get on track. And I think we did that.”

The form he showed for that half decade run, when he won two Cy Young Awards, was as good as anyone in the game. According to ESPN Stats and Information, from 2014 to 2018 Kluber struck out 10 or more in 44 games, second in the AL to Chris Sale. Opponents chased his pitches outside the strike zone at a 33% clip, third in baseball. He also threw the fourth-most pitches in the game over that timeframe.

His run came to a halt on May 1, 2019 when he got hit by a line drive off the bat of Miami Marlins third baseman Brian Anderson. It took Kluber until spring training last year to feel good again.

“In the spring of 2020 I got a text from Corey saying he felt like, in the first time in years, he could do whatever he wanted to do with the baseball,” Cressey said. “He had some subtle things he needed to be addressed. And he did.”

But Kluber never got a chance to showcase it in a big league game. Rangers general manager Jon Daniels was as surprised as anyone when Kluber went down in his first outing for them after coming over from Cleveland before the 2020 season.

“I felt like he was in a really, really good spot, had had really no physical issues at all,” Daniels told the Associated Press and other reporters when Kluber was injured in July. “Really no indication that this was coming. He was throwing the ball really well.”

And so Wednesday is his next step in his comeback. In his last bullpen session over the weekend, he was sitting between 87-89 mph, right where Cressey thinks he should be at this point in his comeback.

“You don’t need to see Corey Kluber go out and throw 95 in the bullpen to know he’s back,” Cressey said. “He’s ahead of everyone else.”

One executive, whose team won’t be in Florida to watch Kluber, calls him the classic “buy low” candidate.

“He might be a middle of the rotation guy to start the season but you’re getting a two-time Cy Young winner,” the executive said. “By the end of the year, he could be leading your staff.”

Kluber actually thinks he’s stronger in certain areas after all the rehab while the rest of his body isn’t worn down after two seasons of fluky injuries.

“I didn’t have to spend the first month of the offseason piecing things back together,” Kluber stated. “But I tried the whole silver lining approach last year. I think I’ve stopped questioning why after this latest one. It is what it is.”

That’s been the prevailing thought from many players during the past 10 months. For those on a long term contract, it’s less of an issue. For those coming back from injury, like Kluber, while also searching for a team to play for, it hasn’t been the easiest of situations to navigate. Kluber admitted he has had moments when he wondered, “What if the pandemic never happened?”

“I spent more time dwelling on it than I should have,” he said. “What could I have done differently? It’s not going to do me any good to keep thinking, ‘What if?’ I did as much as possible. I don’t think I lacked any preparation in summer camp … I’m in a spot now where I can contribute to a team that’s looking to compete.”

As for Wednesday, Kluber isn’t putting more pressure on himself than he needs to. This isn’t a minor leaguer looking for a spring invite. This is a player with a decorated track record.

“I’m confident in throwing whatever pitches and not holding back,” he stated. “No hesitancy in going after it. That’s the goal more than showing I’m Corey Kluber from whatever year.”

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Five things Jeff Passan is hearing — White Sox become AL’s team to beat, the DJ LeMahieu-Yankees staredown and more

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While the trade market has brought most of MLB’s headlines this offseason, the Chicago White Sox spending big to land closer Liam Hendriks shows free agency could soon heat up as well.

Here’s what Jeff Passan is hearing about Chicago handing out a surprisingly large contract, where Fernando Tatis’ contract talks really stand, DJ LeMahieu‘s future — in New York or elsewhere — and much more.

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Liam Hendriks agrees to multiyear deal with Chicago White Sox

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Free-agent closer Liam Hendriks and the Chicago White Sox are in agreement on a multiyear deal, pending a physical, sources told ESPN’s Jeff Passan.

The deal is for three years and includes an option for a fourth and guarantees Hendriks $54 million, sources said.

Hendriks, 31, will make $39 million in the first three years, and the buyout and fourth-year option salary both are $15 million, sources said. If the White Sox decline the option, they will be able to pay the buyout over the course of multiple years.

Yahoo Sports first reported the agreement between Hendriks and the White Sox.

Hendriks, who became a free agent last month when the Oakland Athletics failed to make a qualifying offer, has been one of the most effective relievers in baseball over the past two seasons, ranking second in ERA (1.6), fourth in WHIP (0.87), third in strikeout ratio (7.2) and tied for eighth in saves (39).

He finished the 2020 regular season with a 1.78 ERA and an MLB second-best 14 saves in 15 opportunities, and then recorded a win, a save and a 3.18 ERA in the postseason.

The Australian reliever established career bests with a 12.3 strikeout-walk ratio and 13.1 strikeouts per nine innings last season and was the Reliever of the Year in the American League.

Hendriks became a key piece for A’s manager Bob Melvin late in games during the 2019 season. The right-hander, who earned $2.15 million in 2019, is the former opener who became a reliable closer. He went 4-4 with a 1.80 ERA and 25 saves over a career-high 75 appearances spanning 85 innings and made the All-Star team for the first time. He turns 32 on Feb. 10.

Hendriks was designated for assignment on June 25, 2018 — he has been through that almost a half-dozen times now — and then started Oakland’s 7-2 wild-card loss at Yankee Stadium just more than three months later.

The Oakland closer received a nice raise when he signed a $5.3 million, one-year contract before the 2020 season to avoid salary arbitration.

In 10 major league seasons with the Twins, Royals, Blue Jays and A’s, he has a 19-27 record with 40 saves and a 4.10 ERA.

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