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Miami Marlins acquire Adam Cimber from Cleveland Indians, designate Jose Urena for assignment

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CLEVELAND — The Indians sold side-arm reliever Adam Cimber to the Marlins on Monday for $100,000, and Miami designated right-hander José Ureña for assignment.

Ureña, the Marlins’ Opening Day starter in 2018 and 2019, spent six seasons with the Marlins and had been with them longer than any other active player. He went 0-3 with a 5.40 ERA in five starts last season, when he had a $3.75 million salary and earned $1,388,889 in prorated pay. He had been projected for a salary of about $4 million for 2021.

Cimber went 0-1 with a 3.97 ERA in 14 games this past season for Cleveland, which acquired the right-hander in 2018 from the San Diego Padres in the deal that brought All-Star closer Brad Hand to the Indians.

Cimber, 30, went 6-7 with a 4.30 ERA in 110 appearances with the Indians over 2½ seasons. He was 6-3 in 2019, when he pitched in 68 games.

San Diego selected him in the ninth round of 2013 amateur draft. He pitched in 42 games for the Padres in 2018 before he was traded to Cleveland.

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Liam Hendriks agrees to multiyear deal with Chicago White Sox

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Free-agent closer Liam Hendriks and the Chicago White Sox are in agreement on a multiyear deal, pending a physical, sources told ESPN’s Jeff Passan.

The deal is for three years and includes an option for a fourth and guarantees Hendriks $54 million, sources said.

Hendriks, 31, will make $39 million in the first three years, and the buyout and fourth-year option salary both are $15 million, sources said. If the White Sox decline the option, they will be able to pay the buyout over the course of multiple years.

Yahoo Sports first reported the agreement between Hendriks and the White Sox.

Hendriks, who became a free agent last month when the Oakland Athletics failed to make a qualifying offer, has been one of the most effective relievers in baseball over the past two seasons, ranking second in ERA (1.6), fourth in WHIP (0.87), third in strikeout ratio (7.2) and tied for eighth in saves (39).

He finished the 2020 regular season with a 1.78 ERA and an MLB second-best 14 saves in 15 opportunities, and then recorded a win, a save and a 3.18 ERA in the postseason.

The Australian reliever established career bests with a 12.3 strikeout-walk ratio and 13.1 strikeouts per nine innings last season and was the Reliever of the Year in the American League.

Hendriks became a key piece for A’s manager Bob Melvin late in games during the 2019 season. The right-hander, who earned $2.15 million in 2019, is the former opener who became a reliable closer. He went 4-4 with a 1.80 ERA and 25 saves over a career-high 75 appearances spanning 85 innings and made the All-Star team for the first time. He turns 32 on Feb. 10.

Hendriks was designated for assignment on June 25, 2018 — he has been through that almost a half-dozen times now — and then started Oakland’s 7-2 wild-card loss at Yankee Stadium just more than three months later.

The Oakland closer received a nice raise when he signed a $5.3 million, one-year contract before the 2020 season to avoid salary arbitration.

In 10 major league seasons with the Twins, Royals, Blue Jays and A’s, he has a 19-27 record with 40 saves and a 4.10 ERA.

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Liam Hendricks agrees to multiyear deal with Chicago White Sox

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Free agent closer Liam Hendriks and the Chicago White Sox are in agreement on a multiyear deal, pending a physical, sources told ESPN’s Jeff Passan.

The deal is for three years and includes an option for a fourth, and guarantees Hendriks $54 million, sources said.

Hendricks will make $39 million in the first three years, and the buyout and fourth-year option salary both are $15 million, sources said. If the White Sox decline the option, they will be able to pay the buyout over the course of multiple years.

Yahoo Sports first reported the agreement between Hendriks and the White Sox.

The 31-year-old Hendriks, who became a free agent last month when the Oakland Athletics failed to make a qualifying offer, has been one of the most effective relievers in baseball over the past two seasons, ranking second in ERA (1.6), fourth in WHIP (0.87), third in strikeout ratio (7.2) and tied for eighth in saves (39).

He finished the 2020 regular season with a 1.78 ERA and an MLB second-best 14 saves in 15 opportunities, and then recorded a win, a save and a 3.18 ERA in the postseason.

The Australian reliever established career bests with a 12.3 strikeout-walk ratio and 13.1 strikeouts per nine innings last season and was selected the Reliever of the Year in the American League.

Hendriks became a key piece for A’s manager Bob Melvin late in games during the 2019 season. The right-hander, who earned $2.15 million in 2019, is the former opener who became a reliable closer. He went 4-4 with a 1.80 ERA and 25 saves over a career-high 75 appearances spanning 85 innings and made the All-Star team for the first time. He turns 32 on Feb. 10.

Hendriks even got designated for assignment on June 25, 2018 — he has been through that almost a half-dozen times now — and then started Oakland’s 7-2 wild-card loss at Yankee Stadium just more than three months later.

The Oakland closer received a nice raise when he signed a $5.3 million, one-year contract before the 2020 season to avoid salary arbitration.

In 10 major league seasons with the Twins, Royals, Blue Jays and A’s, he has a 19-27 record with 40 saves and a 4.10 ERA.

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Francisco Lindor says he’s open to discussing long-term deal with New York Mets

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The New York Mets have been searching for years for a superstar position player. They now have one in Francisco Lindor, and the big question on everyone’s mind: Will he sign a long-term deal with the Mets?

Lindor, eligible for free agency after the 2021 season, said during a video call Monday that he’s certainly open to discussing a deal.

“To all of those fans out there, I live life day by day. I’m extremely happy and excited about what’s happening right now, but I haven’t really sat down and talked to anybody,” he said. “Yeah, I had the welcoming conversations and I can’t wait. I’ve never been against an extension. I’ve never been against signing long-term. I’m sure my agent along with the Mets group, they’ll have conversations.”

Lindor, 27, has already talked with owner Steve Cohen, team president Sandy Alderson and general manager Jared Porter. If the two sides do work out an extension, it will likely have to come before Opening Day.

“I have never negotiated a contract during a season,” he said. “Never. I’ve always said before spring training, but once it gets to a point in spring training, it’s time to enjoy the ride and focus on winning and that’s the only thing I should be focusing on, not how much money I’m going to get.”

Alderson said last week that the Mets had not yet spoken to Lindor’s agent, David Meter, but said keeping Lindor in a Mets uniform is the goal. “We acquired Francisco because of his present ability and the possibility that he could be a Met long-term,” Alderson said. “There’s no guarantee of that. It’s something we will approach in the next few weeks.”

Lindor arguably gives the Mets their first franchise position player since David Wright’s prime a decade ago. He has three top-10 MVP finishes in his career — as many as all Mets position players combined over the past 12 seasons (Pete Alonso seventh in 2019, Yoenis Cespedes eighth in 2016 and Wright sixth in 2012). The last position player with back-to-back top-10 MVP finishes was Wright in 2007 and 2008. He improves the defense up the middle — a key offseason objective for Alderson and Porter. Over the past three seasons, the Mets ranked 28th in the majors in defensive runs saved at shortstop; Lindor ranked fifth among shortstops in that span.

The largest contract the Mets have ever given out was the $138 million extension Wright signed after 2012. Jacob deGrom is entering the third season of his five-year, $137.5 million extension. It will cost a lot more than that to sign Lindor, but the Mets now have a deep-pocketed owner in Cohen. A comparable deal might be the 12-year, $365 million contract Mookie Betts signed last summer with the Dodgers, forgoing his own free agency in the process.

“Mookie fell into a great situation and felt comfortable with the L.A. Dodgers and made a decision that was best for him and his family,” Lindor said. “Like I said, I’m not against a long-term [contract]. It just has to make sense for both sides. We’ll see what happens.”

Aside from the contract, Lindor said he’s excited what the Mets are doing and has already talked to several players on the team, including Marcus Stroman, James McCann, Edwin Diaz and Tomas Nido (a childhood friend in Puerto Rico). He’s ready to take on the challenge of the spotlight that comes with playing in New York.

“They say there is a lot of pressure in New York,” he said. “It’s a big market, there are lot of people on top of you. But I’m blessed to play the game. I’m Francisco Lindor. I’m going to do me, and hopefully people like that. Hopefully people embrace me. I’ll embrace them.”

Mets fans shouldn’t have any problem doing that for the player nicknamed Mr. Smile. When asked about the first thing he’ll do when he gets to New York, Lindor smiled and said, “I love pizza, so I’ll probably eat some pizza.”

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