Connect with us

Cricket

David Warner eyes Stuart Broad rematch after paceman’s recall

Published

on


Stuart Broad‘s Ashes batting bunny David Warner is still trying to figure out how it was even possible that the paceman was dropped from England’s first Test match of the northern summer, and paid tribute to the 34-year-old as he stood on the brink of 500 wickets.

In getting out seven times in 10 innings to Broad in England last year, Warner had a previously respectable record in England scythed down to an embarrassing size. The Australian was left questioning plenty about himself and his game in foreign conditions before he returned home to a typically bountiful home season against Pakistan and New Zealand.

Warner admitted to some shock when he saw that Broad was left out for Mark Wood when England played the first Test match since cricket’s return amid the coronavirus pandemic, before the Nottinghamshire seamer was recalled and proved instrumental in securing the hosts victory in the second match of the series and then taking the hosts to the outskirts of another in the decider.

“I think they should not drop him again, I don’t know why they dropped him for that first game,” Warner laughed. “It’d be nice if I was to play over there again and he wasn’t playing. I saw he got a 50 and he’s taking some batting tips off Shane Warne, which is weird, but the way he bowls, the way he’s been bowling the last 18 months has been outstanding. I don’t know what was the reasoning behind leaving him out of that first Test, but obviously he’s come back and taken a few wickets.

“Personally, I think he’s a world-class bowler and the last 18 months he’s really worked hard on pitching the ball up. When I look back on the stats it is probably the first time in his career, he’s actually pitched the ball up in that sort of five to six metres area the bowlers talk about quite a lot. He’s got a hell of a record against left handers as well, and I think the capability of him bringing the ball back off the wicket into the left handers has been another string to his bow.

“Bowlers do tend to talk about not meaning to do that off the seam, but if you keep producing the right seam consistently enough, you’re going to get that sideways movement both ways and he’s been able to get that, and it’s not by fluke that he’s had success the past 18 months, he’s worked really hard to get to where he is and credit to him. Hopefully, yeah, I do get another crack against him.”

“They’re both not express pace, and to take [nearly 1100] wickets between them as a pair when playing together is exceptional. You just can’t go after them, they don’t take their foot off the pedal and when you’re up against them, you’ve got to think of ways to rotate strike.”

Warner on the enduring Broad-Anderson partnership

The sequence of dismissals endured by Warner last year was testament to Broad’s ability to improve himself, having previously struggled to find the right lines and lengths with which to challenge the Australian left-hander, either in challenging Australian conditions or even friendlier home environs during the 2013 and 2015 series. Broad made his own disappointment plain during the first Test against the West Indies in Hampshire, but in the final match of the series at Old Trafford, he has returned to a familiar and prolific partnership with James Anderson.

“I think when you’ve got two quality bowlers who’ve bowled in partnerships for a long, long time, in the partnership they bowl they don’t leak runs, and that’s the most important thing when we bat in partnerships, we try to get off strike, rotate strike, get bowlers off their lines and lengths,” Warner said. “These guys have the ability to keep those runs restricted, and they bowl a length where in England if you go to drive that length, you’re probably going to nick, but also the length means they’re still hitting the stumps, so you can’t really leave it.

“In English conditions they just know how to get wickets and how to not leak runs. I know as well, James Anderson can not take a wicket, but still go for less than two an over. That just shows his experience as well. They’re both not express pace, and to take [nearly 1100] wickets between them as a pair when playing together is exceptional. You just can’t go after them, they don’t take their foot off the pedal and when you’re up against them, you’ve got to think of ways to rotate strike. Otherwise if you give them too many overs at you, they’re going to get you out.”



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Cricket

FICA finds players with pay issues from six T20 leagues, including BPL

Published

on


Over a third of all players have experienced either late or non-payment problems in a host of domestic T20 leagues across the world, according to the latest annual players’ report. The Men’s Global Employment Report 2020, put together by the global players’ body, Federation of International Cricketers’ Associations (FICA), found that 34% of all players had experienced payment troubles.

The body identified six leagues where players have recently experienced pay issues:

The BPL is the only wholly Full Member-run league in that list, but the others – including the GLT20 Canada, the Abu Dhabi T10 and the Euro T20 Slam, which is partly organised by Full Member Cricket Ireland – have attracted big-name players from across the globe.

Protests at the GLT20 last year led to players refusing to take the field in one game. And the Euro T20 Slam, run by the same organising group behind the Canada League, was ultimately called off two weeks before it was due to start because of financial problems.

FICA urged the ICC towards greater involvement in the matter, given that it ultimately sanctions these leagues – a recognition that helps these leagues to attract cricketers.

“Systematic contract breaches and non-payment of players are issues that urgently need addressing,” Tom Moffat, FICA’s CEO, said. “The ICC has an obligation to protect people working within its regulatory frameworks and it’s time something was done about this issue.

“We continue to urge decision-makers to work with FICA at global level, and players’ associations at domestic level, to develop joint solutions to issues highlighted in these reports.”

Because a number of members, including India and Pakistan, don’t have player associations FICA said it believed the true figure of players who have faced problems with payment is “much higher”.

“This is completely unacceptable and there are clear solutions to this issue,” the report stated.

Much of the gaze of the annual report – FICA’s second – is centred around the squeeze in the game’s calendar. The ongoing fallout from the co-existence of domestic T20 leagues alongside international cricket has been a continuing focus for FICA.

FICA said the global structure of international cricket is a “mess”, calling the World Test Championship (WTC) “a sticking plaster solution,” which will not solve basic inequities in the game. “There is significant inconsistency across countries, formats and schedules,” the report said. “Whilst the challenges associated with developing a clear and coherent global structure are understood, the mess of international cricket is confusing for fans and chaotic for players and player pathways.”

Despite the issues with payments, a survey of 277 current men’s internationals found that 53% would still consider becoming freelance cricketers and reject a national central contract if better domestic league contracts were on offer.



Source link

Continue Reading

Cricket

CWI could trim board in response to task force recommendations

Published

on


The CWI board could be cut to nine members if governance reforms recommended by an independent task force are accepted.

CWI currently features an 18-member board including 12 members put forward from the regional boards. But a task force, headed by Jamaican senator Don Wehby, has called for the board to be cut to 12 immediately and nine eventually.

It has also called for the board “to reflect a wide cross section of skills and competencies” and include a minimum of two women. There is currently one woman on the board.

If the recommendations are to be enacted, they will have to be accepted by the current board. That means current board members would effectively have to agree to their own removal.

The task force, which also included Sir Hilary Beckles, Deryck Murray and Charles Wilkin QC, was formed at the request of CWI’s president, Ricky Skerritt, to look into corporate governance at the organisation. Alongside a streamlining of the board, it called for a redefining of the role of the president and vice-president to ensure they were “more board specific and non-executive”.

The recommendation would appear to stem from a previous report, by independent auditors PKF, which raised concerns that during the presidency of Dave Cameron, Skerritt’s predecessor, the line between president and executive was often blurred. Cameron has denied all allegations made in the report.

Other recommendations in the 36-page task force report include the establishment of a nominations committee to “identify and evaluate potential directors and to nominate future directors and committee members” and a reduction in the number of CWI committees from 12 to five. Such a change would be likely see more independent directors, with less influence – and arguably less partisanship – from the regions.

The report, which was compiled after months of consultation and observation of best practice elsewhere, also noted that reform was needed to ensure the sustainability of CWI. It highlighted the “need to foster the rebuilding of trust and a common purpose between CWI and the other stakeholders, especially with regional governments”.

It follows the PKF audit, which suggested CWI has suffered from overly optimistic revenue projections and unsustainable costs. That audit also criticised an opaque and inadequate accounting system, which enabled abuses to go unreported and posed a threat to “the board’s long-term sustainability”.

Former presidents and officials of CWI had previously urged CARICOM (the Caribbean Community) to conduct a forensic audit of the board in order to save West Indies cricket from “absolute and total downfall”.

Skerritt’s ability to see the recommendations enacted may define the success of his period as president. When running for office, he promised to provide greater accountability and transparency. Comprehensive reform and modernisation of CWI’s governance structure would form a major part of that.



Source link

Continue Reading

Cricket

CWI could trim board in response to task force recommendations

Published

on


The CWI board could be cut to nine members if governance reforms recommended by an independent task force are accepted.

CWI currently features an 18-member board including 12 members put forward from the regional boards. But a task force, headed by Jamaican senator Don Wehby, has called for the board to be cut to 12 immediately and nine eventually.

It has also called for the board “to reflect a wide cross section of skills and competencies” and include a minimum of two women. There is currently one woman on the board.

If the recommendations are to be enacted, they will have to be accepted by the current board. That means current board members would effectively have to agree to their own removal.

The task force, which also included Sir Hilary Beckles, Deryck Murray and Charles Wilkin QC, was formed at the request of CWI’s president, Ricky Skerritt, to look into corporate governance at the organisation. Alongside a streamlining of the board, it called for a redefining of the role of the president and vice-president to ensure they were “more board specific and non-executive”.

The recommendation would appear to stem from a previous report, by independent auditors PKF, which raised concerns that during the presidency of Dave Cameron, Skerritt’s predecessor, the line between president and executive was often blurred. Cameron has denied all allegations made in the report.

Other recommendations in the 36-page task force report include the establishment of a nominations committee to “identify and evaluate potential directors and to nominate future directors and committee members” and a reduction in the number of CWI committees from 12 to five. Such a change would be likely see more independent directors, with less influence – and arguably less partisanship – from the regions.

The report, which was compiled after months of consultation and observation of best practice elsewhere, also noted that reform was needed to ensure the sustainability of CWI. It highlighted the “need to foster the rebuilding of trust and a common purpose between CWI and the other stakeholders, especially with regional governments”.

It follows the PKF audit, which suggested CWI has suffered from overly optimistic revenue projections and unsustainable costs. That audit also criticised an opaque and inadequate accounting system, which enabled abuses to go unreported and posed a threat to “the board’s long-term sustainability”.

Former presidents and officials of CWI had previously urged CARICOM (the Caribbean Community) to conduct a forensic audit of the board in order to save West Indies cricket from “absolute and total downfall”.

Skerritt’s ability to see the recommendations enacted may define the success of his period as president. When running for office, he promised to provide greater accountability and transparency. Comprehensive reform and modernisation of CWI’s governance structure would form a major part of that.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending