Connect with us

MLB

Kiley McDaniel’s MLB farm system rankings for all 30 teams

Published

on

I’ve always felt that the typical way to compile organizational farm rankings wasn’t good enough. Judging any one prospect is tough enough using all of the available data, if you can get it all.

That said, we have trades, and the order in which players were drafted, as hard evidence of teams’ opinions to anchor around.

Judging an entire farm system is much tougher. There is no hard data about the opinions that teams have about the strength of a system as a whole. And subjectively deciding that this group of 30 players is better than that group of 24 players is invariably full of bias; our brains can’t consider all 54 players independently from those two teams, much less 30 teams’ worth of prospects.

When I worked with an MLB club, then later at FanGraphs, and now at ESPN, I’ve used the Future Value system. It’s scaled to WAR (an all-inclusive number of how good any player is, measured in wins) and adjusts for proximity to the majors and risk. On the team-by-team top 10s, I spelled out the FV grades for more than 300 players, listed about a dozen more prospects for each team, and I had about another dozen or so for each team whom I could have listed: the average number of players on my list for each team was 39. (For those wondering, I have updated the FV grades for recent Tommy John surgery announcements on Tigers LHP Joey Wentz, Padres RHP Reggie Lawson and Padres RHP Andres Munoz.)

The next step was something Craig Edwards did for us at FanGraphs last year, using the last couple of decades of players to figure out how much a prospect is really worth. The idea is to take every prospect and put them into a bin based on how they were ranked as a prospect, then look at what their career was like, then do some economic adjustments and assign values to each bin, which are then applied to every prospect. The output is a number that represents what a team would bid for each prospect if he was at auction and the team was trying to value its six to seven controlled years in the big leagues before the player hit free agency. The top prospect in baseball, Rays shortstop Wander Franco, is worth $112 million, which means we expect he’ll produce $112 million of value above his salary for those six-plus seasons before he hits free agency; he might make $50 million in salary during that time.

The cutoff for what players make the list is still somewhat subjective. The concept is any player with real trade value: When you see a guy traded who isn’t good enough to be on here, it’s usually as a placeholder in a salary dump trade, whether it’s a late-round pick in the low minors, a back-half-of-the-roster type in the middle minors or an upper-minors player who is likely to be on waivers in the next 12 months. Sometimes a player emerges late and I haven’t updated his rating, most commonly at the lowest levels of the minors at the trade deadline, but updated scouting reports usually come to the surface the day of a trade.

Reducing complicated, unique people into numbers, and more specifically money, isn’t a great feeling, but it’s not done to change anybody’s career, merely to measure which team is doing the best job at cultivating young talent. There are some instances where two teams are within a couple of million dollars of each other, and in those cases the advantage is given to the team that reached that value with the fewest amount of players. I’ve also made slight adjustments where teams benefited from having bulk value of prospects that, on average, aren’t list quality. The Mariners (one spot), Giants (one spot) and Blue Jays (two spots) were the teams whose rankings were impacted in this regard. Functionally, think of the average value per player as the tiebreaker when two teams are close.

For this reason, I encourage you to look at the rankings in tiers; if one midlevel pitcher goes down with surgery and his grade is downgraded a notch or two, some systems could move down three or four slots. In total, there are 1,182 prospects and $6.53 billion of surplus value in the minor leagues by my system. A more complete picture of the young talent within an organization would include big league talent (most recently suggested by ESPN’s Karl Ravech) — that’s on the coronavirus shutdown to-do list.

Source link

MLB

Ripple effect of the coronavirus: College baseball programs canceled – Chicago Bears Blog

Published

on

VERNON HILLS, Ill. — Tony Brown’s dream of playing college baseball became a reality when he committed to Furman University in August 2019.

Or so it seemed.

Furman, located in Greenville, South Carolina, was one of two Division I schools that extended baseball offers to Brown. And make no mistake, Brown worked hard for those offers.

An all-area middle infielder and three-year varsity starter at Vernon Hills High School in suburban Chicago, Brown — the son of former Chicago Bears defensive end Alex Brown — made the difficult decision to temporarily withdraw from high school prior to his senior year in 2018-19 and reclassify. It meant, among other things, no high school baseball that spring.

While preparing for his “second” senior year in 2019-20, Brown committed to Furman before the coronavirus pandemic hit and the season was canceled.

For Brown, missing two consecutive years of high school baseball stung. Still, he would be continuing his baseball career at Furman. Or so he thought.

The bottom fell out on May 18, when Furman athletics director Jason Donnelly announced the university would discontinue the men’s baseball and men’s lacrosse programs because of the financial impact of the pandemic.

“We were all on a call and the AD just broke everything down for us,” Alex Brown said. “He broke the news to us.”

The COVID-19 pandemic had an impact on high school seniors across the country who had their spring sports seasons canceled. But it also has impacted sports at the collegiate level. Athletes such as Tony Brown will start the recruiting process all over again. For his father and mother, it was hard to see their son’s disappointment.

“I’m outside coming back from a run and my wife [Kari] and Tony walk out, and Tony rarely cries, but he has tears in his eyes, and my wife has tears in her eyes, so I know something bad has happened,” the elder Brown said. “It was just heartbreaking.”


Alex played defensive end for the Bears and the New Orleans Saints during a nine-year NFL career. Tony is a gifted student (above 4.0 GPA, 1320 SAT, 27 ACT). Vernon Hills recently named Brown the athlete of the year and also bestowed upon him a schoolwide math award, voted on by the faculty.

“I’m Tony’s baseball coach, but I’m also a math teacher, and I had Tony in class,” Vernon Hills varsity baseball coach Jay Czarnecki said. “I’m a pre-calculus honors teacher. The math award that Tony won goes to the student who brings a different dimension to your class, helps make it a better place and includes all the kids as a leader in the classroom. It’s very rare your school’s athlete of the year also wins the math award. It gives you a picture of the kind of kid that Tony is.”

In elementary school, Brown skipped third grade, which proved the correct move academically but left him perpetually a year younger than his classmates. Nevertheless, by halfway through his freshman season — at the age equivalent to an eighth grader — Brown was promoted to varsity and went on to star for the Cougars in baseball and basketball over the next three years.

For whatever reasons, however, baseball recruiters weren’t paying much attention.

“We weren’t trying to gain an advantage by taking him out of school; it was just putting him in the grade he would’ve been in,” Alex said. “Had Tony continued on the road he was on, he would have been 16 years old for the first month and a half of his senior year.”

The extra year worked. Matt Plante, the vice president of Top Tier baseball who coached Brown on the program’s top 17U team last summer, said Brown’s performance on the elite travel baseball circuit improved dramatically after the reclassification.

“The kid is a hard worker,” Plante said. “He works his tail off. First year he played with Top Tier (2018), he was a 6.8 or 6.9 60-yard dash runner; when he came back and reclassified, he got down to 6.6. All the measurable — exit velocity, overall strength — they all went up. First couple of tournaments last summer, he was on fire.”

But for Tony, sitting out that first high school season was hard.

“The first couple of months were definitely the toughest because I’d grown up with everyone that was having their senior year and I had to watch them reach all those milestones,” Brown said. “It was hard to see them live out their senior year; but I knew I had to make the most out of this year off because when I come back I’ll be a completely different player. I really needed that year to develop.”

The process culminated in Furman extending Brown an offer to join its baseball program.

“We told him to take a day [to think about the Furman offer] and make sure it’s the right fit,” Brown’s mother, Kari said. “He woke up at 6 a.m. the next day and said he was ready to go.”

Now Brown has to begin anew.

“We honestly have to go through the recruiting process all over again,” he said. “I know how hard it was to get those offers, and it’s tough — it’s hard to reach out to schools because the roster spots are full and they don’t have any scholarships left. I’m going to have to make some tough decisions as to if I want to walk on or go to a junior college. I honestly don’t know.”


Furman isn’t the only school to eliminate college baseball because of cost-cutting measures related to COVID-19.

Just six miles north of Tony’s alma mater, Jay Ward was a star left-handed pitcher at Carmel High School who committed in the summer of 2017 to play baseball at Bowling Green in Ohio. Ward appeared in nine games as a freshman in 2019 and pitched well in five relief outings this season before the NCAA canceled the remainder of the college season because of COVID-19.

“We were on our way to play games in the state of Alabama,” Ward said. “We got to Cincinnati and stopped for food. All of a sudden, the coaches got a call and we turned the bus around and headed straight back. We were sitting in the locker room and the coaches told us the rest of the season had been canceled. You could hear a pin drop in there. No one saw that coming.”

But that wasn’t the worst of it.

“Every week after the season was canceled, we’d have a Zoom call with the team,” Ward said. “We had a Zoom call scheduled with the team at 1:45 p.m. on Friday, May 15, and I couldn’t be on the call because I was taking my last final. Apparently, 15 minutes before that Zoom call was supposed to happen, our coaches were told to be on another Zoom call with the director of athletics and a bunch of other important people in the athletic department at the school, and during that call they told the coaches they were cutting the program.

“The coaches had no idea. They were totally blindsided. … So I’m sitting there taking my final and my phone started blowing up. I’m like this is not normal. And guys are telling me the program was cut. I didn’t believe it. I thought it was a joke. Then I went on Twitter and read that Bowling Green had cut the program.”

The Bowling Green athletic department announced the university was “undergoing restructuring brought on by the current financial crisis” and athletics had been instructed to reduce its annual budget by $2 million. Eliminating baseball — the school’s release stated — will save the school approximately $500,000 annually.

“From there, everything spiraled,” Ward said. “I had my classes picked out for next year, I had my schedule, I had a lease for a house … all those plans just got flipped over. It was a total blindside. They didn’t say anything to us, they didn’t say anything to the coaches … they just cut the program. I had to call my parents and tell them what happened. I was just like, ‘No way this just happened, no.'”

Ward moved swiftly, posting his video highlights and statistics on Twitter and tagging several well-known baseball recruiting sites. Since the NCAA will permit players such as Ward to transfer and play immediately for any school next year — scholarship agreements also will be honored for players affected at Bowling Green and Furman if they choose to stay and pursue their studies — the response has been encouraging. Ward has heard from several programs and received one offer.

“Everyone needs left-handed pitching,” Ward said. “I’m blessed in that regard.”


College baseball is not like college football, for which full-ride scholarships are plentiful. NCAA Division I baseball programs are allowed to offer a maximum of 11.7 fully funded scholarships to be spread over rosters that often reach 30 to 40 players. Standout students such as Tony Brown can additionally receive some academic scholarship money to help offset a greater portion of the cost, but the average scholarship amount most college baseball programs will offer players is around 40%.

College baseball’s scholarship distribution system doesn’t sit well with Joe Ferro — Brown’s hitting instructor for the past 11 years and current baseball director of Phenom Wisconsin.

“So many times now, schools are bringing 20 kids in and half of those kids are gone after the first semester,” Ferro said. “I think the NCAA needs to do a better job regulating scholarships and do a better job regulating what’s going on and how much abuse of power can happen from the coaching staff. As a coach, you should also be graded on your transfers, in my opinion. If you’re bringing 20 kids in and you’re making promises to 20 kids and 15 are leaving, that’s not fair. You’re not being genuine to the kids you are recruiting.”

College baseball recruiting is as tricky as ever. Long before former Furman and Bowling Green players began searching for new schools, the NCAA granted an extra year of eligibility to seniors unable to play their final collegiate season due to COVID-19. A good number of roster spots annually earmarked for incoming recruits will instead revert back to the seniors who accept the extra year of eligibility.

Also muddying the waters is MLB’s revenue-related decision to trim the upcoming amateur draft from 40 rounds to five. Prospects not selected in the top five rounds can still sign with MLB teams, but for a maximum of only $20,000. Given the choice of returning to college or signing for that amount, many undrafted players — especially those who otherwise likely would have been selected in Rounds 6 through 10 — will opt for another year of college baseball, which further shrinks the number of available roster spots for guys such as Brown and Ward.

“A lot of the Power 5 conference schools I talk to say we don’t have any room for any kids in the class of 2020 or 2021,” Plante said. “They’re on to the class of 2022 and 2023.”

Which makes Brown’s chances of finding a home even more difficult.

“It’s been a long road,” Alex Brown said. “We spent the better half of two years trying to explain to him that if you work your ass off and do everything right that this [the chance to play Division I college baseball] could happen — and then you find what you feel the perfect place is and then it doesn’t happen.”

Tony Brown is undeterred.

“I would still be in bed crying if that had happened to me,” his mother said. “He cried for about 30 minutes and said, ‘Let’s go workout.’ It doesn’t stop. You have to keep grinding.”

Source link

Continue Reading

MLB

Tim Kurkjian’s Baseball Fix – Cal Ripken, the birth of The Streak and the toughness it took to keep it going

Published

on

You love baseball. Tim Kurkjian loves baseball. So while we await its return, every day we’ll provide you with a story or two tied to this date in baseball history.

ON THIS DATE IN 1982, Cal Ripken began his consecutive-games streak.

It ended 16 years and 2,632 games later, a streak that demolished the previous record of 2,130 by Lou Gehrig, and probably is the most unbreakable MLB record. It was a streak achieved by an unbelievably competitive person, a man who always wanted to be available to help his team, a remarkably strong man and, after his father, the toughest person I’ve ever met.

The full “On this date …” archive

“Cal is an alien,” teammate Randy Milligan once said.

On Opening Day 1985, Game 444 of The Streak, Ripken rolled his left ankle when his spikes caught on the second-base bag on a pickoff play. He heard a pop, but, naturally, he stayed in the game. His ankle was so badly bruised it was black and blue all around. On orders from the team, he went to the hospital after the game. The doctor gave him crutches, and told him to stay on them for two weeks. Ripken got to his car, threw the crutches away, treated the ankle all night and next day (a day off; otherwise, he said, he would not have been able to play). But a day later, he played.

How?

“I just taped it up real tight, it was fine,” Ripken said.

Ripken’s pain tolerance was remarkable. Among the many games (indoor hockey; sockball, which was baseball with a taped-up sock) he played in the Orioles’ clubhouse was a game that Ripken invented, and, of course, he was the champion of: which player could withstand the most pain, and which was the hardest to bruise.

“Ten minutes before the start of a game, Rip threw me down and stuck a knuckle in my ribs,” pitcher Ben McDonald said. “Then a couple of guys jumped him, and dug their knuckles in his ribs. We had him pinned down. He was yelling, ‘No! No!’ But he wouldn’t give up. He would rather die. The next day, we compared ribs. I had three big bruises; he had one tiny red spot.”

McDonald laughed.

“I can’t wait until The Streak is over,” McDonald said in 1995. “A bunch of us are going to get him down and pummel him. But we still won’t be able to hurt him. And he will not bruise.”

The toughness came from Ripken’s father, Cal Sr. He was once hit in the face by a line drive while throwing batting practice at Fenway Park. Orioles trainer Richie Bancells raced to the mound. Rip Sr. was bleeding badly, but he screamed at Bancells, “Get the hell out of here! I haven’t finished my round.” He finished his round of BP, went to the hospital and was back in the third-base coaching box, with stitches in his face, in the third inning.

Ripken Sr. was a great soccer player. He played into his mid-50s against men half his age.

“When I was a kid, he came home from a soccer game with his huge blood blister on his big toe; those are very painful,” Ripken Jr. said. “He took me down to our workshop in the basement, he took out a power drill, and drilled a hole into his toenail, relieving the pressure. Blood came spurting out. He said, ‘Oooooooooh, that feels good!”’

Other baseball notes for May 30

  • In 1894, Bobby Lowe became the first player to hit four home runs in a game. He weighed 150 pounds. He hit all four off Ice Box Chamberlain. The next player to hit four in a game was Gehrig, in 1932.

  • In 1927, Walter Johnson threw his final shutout, No. 110. Different time, different game, obviously, but Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine and John Smoltz combined for 76 shutouts.

  • In 1972, Manny Ramirez was born. Forget, for a second, all the trouble he got into. He was a very smart hitter and had great balance and one of the most beautiful swings ever by a right-handed hitter.

  • In 1985, Fernando Salas was born. He is the only active pitcher whose last name is a palindrome. His most recent palindromic pitching line was July 5, 2018: 1-1-1-1-1-1.

Source link

Continue Reading

MLB

Ripple effect of the coronavirus: College baseball programs canceled – Chicago Bears Blog

Published

on

VERNON HILLS, Ill. — Tony Brown’s dream of playing college baseball became a reality when he committed to Furman University in August 2019.

Or so it seemed.

Furman, located in Greenville, South Carolina, was one of two Division I schools that extended baseball offers to Brown. And make no mistake, Brown worked hard for those offers.

An all-area middle infielder and three-year varsity starter at Vernon Hills High School in suburban Chicago, Brown — the son of former Chicago Bears defensive end Alex Brown — made the difficult decision to temporarily withdraw from high school prior to his senior year in 2018-19 and reclassify. It meant, among other things, no high school baseball that spring.

While preparing for his “second” senior year in 2019-20, Brown committed to Furman before the coronavirus pandemic hit and the season was canceled.

For Brown, missing two consecutive years of high school baseball stung. Still, he would be continuing his baseball career at Furman. Or so he thought.

The bottom fell out on May 18, when Furman athletics director Jason Donnelly announced the university would discontinue the men’s baseball and men’s lacrosse programs because of the financial impact of the pandemic.

“We were all on a call and the AD just broke everything down for us,” Alex Brown said. “He broke the news to us.”

The COVID-19 pandemic had an impact on high school seniors across the country who had their spring sports seasons canceled. But it also has impacted sports at the collegiate level. Athletes such as Tony Brown will start the recruiting process all over again. For his father and mother, it was hard to see their son’s disappointment.

“I’m outside coming back from a run and my wife [Kari] and Tony walk out, and Tony rarely cries, but he has tears in his eyes, and my wife has tears in her eyes, so I know something bad has happened,” the elder Brown said. “It was just heartbreaking.”


Alex played defensive end for the Bears and the New Orleans Saints during a nine-year NFL career. Tony is a gifted student (above 4.0 GPA, 1320 SAT, 27 ACT). Vernon Hills recently named Brown the athlete of the year and also bestowed upon him a schoolwide math award, voted on by the faculty.

“I’m Tony’s baseball coach, but I’m also a math teacher, and I had Tony in class,” Vernon Hills varsity baseball coach Jay Czarnecki said. “I’m a pre-calculus honors teacher. The math award that Tony won goes to the student who brings a different dimension to your class, helps make it a better place and includes all the kids as a leader in the classroom. It’s very rare your school’s athlete of the year also wins the math award. It gives you a picture of the kind of kid that Tony is.”

In elementary school, Brown skipped third grade, which proved the correct move academically but left him perpetually a year younger than his classmates. Nevertheless, by halfway through his freshman season — at the age equivalent to an eighth grader — Brown was promoted to varsity and went on to star for the Cougars in baseball and basketball over the next three years.

For whatever reasons, however, baseball recruiters weren’t paying much attention.

“We weren’t trying to gain an advantage by taking him out of school; it was just putting him in the grade he would’ve been in,” Alex said. “Had Tony continued on the road he was on, he would have been 16 years old for the first month and a half of his senior year.”

The extra year worked. Matt Plante, the vice president of Top Tier baseball who coached Brown on the program’s top 17U team last summer, said Brown’s performance on the elite travel baseball circuit improved dramatically after the reclassification.

“The kid is a hard worker,” Plante said. “He works his tail off. First year he played with Top Tier (2018), he was a 6.8 or 6.9 60-yard dash runner; when he came back and reclassified, he got down to 6.6. All the measurable — exit velocity, overall strength — they all went up. First couple of tournaments last summer, he was on fire.”

But for Tony, sitting out that first high school season was hard.

“The first couple of months were definitely the toughest because I’d grown up with everyone that was having their senior year and I had to watch them reach all those milestones,” Brown said. “It was hard to see them live out their senior year; but I knew I had to make the most out of this year off because when I come back I’ll be a completely different player. I really needed that year to develop.”

The process culminated in Furman extending Brown an offer to join its baseball program.

“We told him to take a day [to think about the Furman offer] and make sure it’s the right fit,” Brown’s mother, Kari said. “He woke up at 6 a.m. the next day and said he was ready to go.”

Now Brown has to begin anew.

“We honestly have to go through the recruiting process all over again,” he said. “I know how hard it was to get those offers, and it’s tough — it’s hard to reach out to schools because the roster spots are full and they don’t have any scholarships left. I’m going to have to make some tough decisions as to if I want to walk on or go to a junior college. I honestly don’t know.”


Furman isn’t the only school to eliminate college baseball because of cost-cutting measures related to COVID-19.

Just six miles north of Tony’s alma mater, Jay Ward was a star left-handed pitcher at Carmel High School who committed in the summer of 2017 to play baseball at Bowling Green in Ohio. Ward appeared in nine games as a freshman in 2019 and pitched well in five relief outings this season before the NCAA canceled the remainder of the college season because of COVID-19.

“We were on our way to play games in the state of Alabama,” Ward said. “We got to Cincinnati and stopped for food. All of a sudden, the coaches got a call and we turned the bus around and headed straight back. We were sitting in the locker room and the coaches told us the rest of the season had been canceled. You could hear a pin drop in there. No one saw that coming.”

But that wasn’t the worst of it.

“Every week after the season was canceled, we’d have a Zoom call with the team,” Ward said. “We had a Zoom call scheduled with the team at 1:45 p.m. on Friday, May 15, and I couldn’t be on the call because I was taking my last final. Apparently, 15 minutes before that Zoom call was supposed to happen, our coaches were told to be on another Zoom call with the director of athletics and a bunch of other important people in the athletic department at the school, and during that call they told the coaches they were cutting the program.

“The coaches had no idea. They were totally blindsided. … So I’m sitting there taking my final and my phone started blowing up. I’m like this is not normal. And guys are telling me the program was cut. I didn’t believe it. I thought it was a joke. Then I went on Twitter and read that Bowling Green had cut the program.”

The Bowling Green athletic department announced the university was “undergoing restructuring brought on by the current financial crisis” and athletics had been instructed to reduce its annual budget by $2 million. Eliminating baseball — the school’s release stated — will save the school approximately $500,000 annually.

“From there, everything spiraled,” Ward said. “I had my classes picked out for next year, I had my schedule, I had a lease for a house … all those plans just got flipped over. It was a total blindside. They didn’t say anything to us, they didn’t say anything to the coaches … they just cut the program. I had to call my parents and tell them what happened. I was just like, ‘No way this just happened, no.'”

Ward moved swiftly, posting his video highlights and statistics on Twitter and tagging several well-known baseball recruiting sites. Since the NCAA will permit players such as Ward to transfer and play immediately for any school next year — scholarship agreements also will be honored for players affected at Bowling Green and Furman if they choose to stay and pursue their studies — the response has been encouraging. Ward has heard from several programs and received one offer.

“Everyone needs left-handed pitching,” Ward said. “I’m blessed in that regard.”


College baseball is not like college football, for which full-ride scholarships are plentiful. NCAA Division I baseball programs are allowed to offer a maximum of 11.7 fully funded scholarships to be spread over rosters that often reach 30 to 40 players. Standout students such as Tony Brown can additionally receive some academic scholarship money to help offset a greater portion of the cost, but the average scholarship amount most college baseball programs will offer players is around 40%.

College baseball’s scholarship distribution system doesn’t sit well with Joe Ferro — Brown’s hitting instructor for the past 11 years and current baseball director of Phenom Wisconsin.

“So many times now, schools are bringing 20 kids in and half of those kids are gone after the first semester,” Ferro said. “I think the NCAA needs to do a better job regulating scholarships and do a better job regulating what’s going on and how much abuse of power can happen from the coaching staff. As a coach, you should also be graded on your transfers, in my opinion. If you’re bringing 20 kids in and you’re making promises to 20 kids and 15 are leaving, that’s not fair. You’re not being genuine to the kids you are recruiting.”

College baseball recruiting is as tricky as ever. Long before former Furman and Bowling Green players began searching for new schools, the NCAA granted an extra year of eligibility to seniors unable to play their final collegiate season due to COVID-19. A good number of roster spots annually earmarked for incoming recruits will instead revert back to the seniors who accept the extra year of eligibility.

Also muddying the waters is MLB’s revenue-related decision to trim the upcoming amateur draft from 40 rounds to five. Prospects not selected in the top five rounds can still sign with MLB teams, but for a maximum of only $20,000. Given the choice of returning to college or signing for that amount, many undrafted players — especially those who otherwise likely would have been selected in Rounds 6 through 10 — will opt for another year of college baseball, which further shrinks the number of available roster spots for guys such as Brown and Ward.

“A lot of the Power 5 conference schools I talk to say we don’t have any room for any kids in the class of 2020 or 2021,” Plante said. “They’re on to the class of 2022 and 2023.”

Which makes Brown’s chances of finding a home even more difficult.

“It’s been a long road,” Alex Brown said. “We spent the better half of two years trying to explain to him that if you work your ass off and do everything right that this [the chance to play Division I college baseball] could happen — and then you find what you feel the perfect place is and then it doesn’t happen.”

Tony Brown is undeterred.

“I would still be in bed crying if that had happened to me,” his mother said. “He cried for about 30 minutes and said, ‘Let’s go workout.’ It doesn’t stop. You have to keep grinding.”

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending