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Fire breaks out at Rangers’ new stadium

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ARLINGTON, Texas — Fire broke out Saturday at the future home of the Texas Rangers, which is under construction in Arlington.

Arlington Fire Department Lt. Mike Joiner said the blaze was brought under control and no injuries were reported. The cause of the fire has not been determined.

Rangers spokesman John Blake told the Dallas Morning News that he was awaiting more information on the fire.

Blake did not immediately return a phone call to The Associated Press for comment.

The estimated $1.1 billion Globe Life Field includes a retractable roof and is scheduled to open for the 2020 Major League Baseball season

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Sources — MLB has preliminary talks about bubble-type format for playoffs

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Major League Baseball has had preliminary discussions about holding its postseason in a bubble-type format after the coronavirus outbreaks on the St. Louis Cardinals and Miami Marlins that wreaked havoc on the regular-season schedule illustrated how a similar scenario could upend the playoffs, sources familiar with the conversations told ESPN.

While a fully contained bubble similar to the NBA setup at the Walt Disney World Resort in Florida would be difficult for MLB to replicate, a multicity format that replicates the NHL’s Toronto and Edmonton hubs has gained traction, sources said.

Because of MLB’s expansion to 16 playoff teams, the league would need at least three hubs to complete its wild-card round before shrinking to a two-hub format for the division series. The league championship series and World Series could be held at one or two stadiums. Remaining in one metropolitan area would allow teams to avoid air travel and perhaps remain at a single hotel for the entire postseason, which is scheduled to begin Sept. 27.

Southern California, the greater Chicago area and the New York metropolitan area make the most sense because of the available stadiums, sources said. Concerns about weather in late September and deep into October make the Los Angeles area the most logical choice to host an entire postseason, though the sources cautioned that because of the nascent nature of discussions, no favorite has emerged.

Currently, MLB plans to hold its postseason with home games spread throughout the country. While the top four seeds in each league would host all three potential wild-card-round games to cut down on travel, the five-game division series and seven-game league championship series and World Series would include regular travel — and potentially the cross-country flights that the regular-season schedule has eliminated.

The acknowledgement from officials that a bubble-type atmosphere could help insulate MLB from a coronavirus outbreak comes in the wake of a rash of cases that has halted the Cardinals’ season since July 29 and previously sidelined the Marlins for eight days. The NBA and NHL bubbles have been considered wild successes, with both leagues going weeks without a confirmed case of the coronavirus. The Los Angeles Times first mentioned the league’s pursuit of a postseason bubble.

Even if playoff teams were to avoid a full-fledged outbreak, even one positive case on a team could cause significant issues. If a player were found through contact tracing to have been exposed to a COVID-positive teammate, he would need to quarantine, potentially disrupting a team’s chances in a series. In the case of multiple positives, games could possibly be postponed, particularly if a team traveled in close quarters. Not only would a bubble lessen potential exposure, in theory it would help teams maintain the sort of distance necessary to preclude shutdowns that could threaten the integrity of the postseason schedule and cause disarray.

In April, MLB considered pursuing a season-long bubble but ultimately balked after concerns over logistics, as well as player pushback, never allowed it to extend beyond planning stages. Since the season began July 23, positive tests have been limited to the Cardinals’ and Marlins’ outbreaks. Both teams acknowledged the spread of the virus because of lax adherence to the protocol agreed upon by the league and players.

A bubble with stricter protocols ostensibly would inure the league from such concerns during the postseason. With more than $1 billion in television revenue depending on the playoffs, the league and players are motivated to finish the expanded playoffs after their abbreviated 60-game season.

Though the shape of a theoretical baseball postseason bubble is not clear, it could look something like this:

  • The three-game National League wild-card round, played in three days, would stage the No. 1 seed vs. No. 8, No. 2 vs. No. 7 and No. 3 vs. No. 6 at Dodger Stadium. The same American League seeds would play at Angel Stadium, about 30 miles southeast in Anaheim. And the Nos. 4 and 5 seeds in both leagues would face off at Petco Park in San Diego

  • The NL Division Series would hold two games a day at Dodger Stadium and the ALDS two games a day at Angel Stadium

  • The NLCS would be held at Dodger Stadium and the ALCS at Angel Stadium, or both would be played at a single site

  • The World Series would be held at a single site or perhaps both

Staging such an endeavor isn’t without problems. Holding three games at the same stadium on the same day is troublesome logistically — and, if on the West Coast, potentially would require one game to start before noon. Questions about ample pregame practice as well as properly disinfecting clubhouses between games could prompt the league to consider a bubble of four sites for the wild-card round before shrinking to two after half the teams are eliminated within the first three days. The league potentially could expand a bubble to the Bay Area to satisfy that.

New York, with Yankee Stadium and Citi Field, could pair with Philadelphia or Baltimore and Washington for an East Coast hub setup. Wrigley Field and Guaranteed Rate Field in Chicago, along with Milwaukee, could constitute a Midwest hub. Perhaps half the teams could play in New York and the other half in Southern California, with the East Coast winners flying to California at the beginning of October and spending the remainder of the month in the Los Angeles area.

The possibilities, this early in the process, are endless. But the discussions are being taken seriously enough that one official told ESPN: “If we want to make sure we get through October, we really need to get this right.”

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Tigers’ C.J. Cron hit in knee by grounder, leaves game vs. White Sox

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DETROIT — Tigers first baseman C.J. Cron exited Monday night’s game against the Chicago White Sox with a left knee injury.

Cron was struck by Danny Mendick‘s hard-hit grounder in the fourth inning and stayed down for a while. He eventually walked off with some assistance.

Detroit pitcher Daniel Norris made an acrobatic play, hustling over to retrieve the ball and retiring Mendick with a diving tag while Cron lay on the ground in pain.

The Tigers added Cron this offseason to provide more power in what was an anemic lineup in 2019. He’s hitting .190 but does have four home runs.

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Indians’ Mike Clevinger to miss start after violating protocols

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Cleveland Indians right-hander Mike Clevinger will not make his scheduled Tuesday start after the team learned that he violated virus safety protocol while on the road in Chicago.

Clevinger is the second Indians pitcher in as many days to be cited by the team for violating protocol in Chicago. Zach Plesac had to drive back to Cleveland in a rental car Sunday before the Indians wrapped up their series against the White Sox after he left the team hotel to go out Saturday night.

Clevinger accompanied Plesac when he went out Saturday night in Chicago, a source told ESPN’s Jeff Passan. But Clevinger flew home with the team, which did not know about his violation before the team departed.

In a statement Monday, the Indians said Clevinger will go into quarantine and will undergo testing while away from his teammates.

Adam Plutko (1-0) will now start Tuesday night’s series opener against the Cubs in Cleveland.

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