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Nats’ Turner hits for another cycle against Rockies

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WASHINGTON — The Rockies bring out the best in Trea Turner.

On Tuesday night, the Nationals shortstop hit for the cycle during Washington’s 11-1 win over Colorado, the second time in his career that he’s accomplished the feat versus the Rockies. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, he’s just the third player in MLB history to hit for the cycle multiple times against the same team. Fred Clarke of the Pittsburgh Pirates had two cycles against the Reds (1901, 1903), and Christian Yelich did it twice last year, also against Cincinnati.

Turner led off the bottom of the first with a solo home run against Colorado starter Peter Lambert. In the second inning, he grounded a single off Lambert for a single. Facing Lambert again in the fifth, Turner hit a liner down the right field line that glanced off Charlie Blackmon’s glove and rolled into the corner for a triple. After grounding into an inning-ending double play against lefty reliever Sam Howard in the sixth, Turner came up in the seventh against righty Jairo Diaz and laced an RBI double to the gap in right-centerfield.

Turner is the 26th player in major-league history to hit for multiple cycles in his career. He previously did it on April 25, 2017 at Coors Field. In 18 career games against Colorado, the 26-year old speedster is now batting .386 with 16 extra-base hits.

Of the 10 cycles that the Rockies have now allowed in their history, Turner’s is the first one to be accomplished away from Coors Field.

Earlier this season, Turner missed six weeks due to a fractured right index finger that he suffered as the result a hit-by-pitch. In 60 games with Washington this year, he’s hitting .286 with eight home runs and 20 stolen bases.

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Los Angeles Dodgers to sign ex-A’s closer Blake Treinen

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Right-hander Blake Treinen and the Los Angeles Dodgers have agreed to a one-year, $10 million deal, sources told ESPN’s Jeff Passan on Wednesday.

Treinen had multiple offers in that range and chose the Dodgers.

Treinen, 31, posted a 0.78 ERA in 2018 with the Oakland Athletics, but that number ballooned to 4.91 in 2019. Treinen started the 2019 season as A’s closer but wasn’t nearly as consistent. He had a 6.14 ERA during a 19-game span from April 28 to June 20 before a strained pitching shoulder put him on the injured list.

Once healthy and back July 3, Treinen didn’t have a save over his next 27 appearances and posted a 6.17 ERA.

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

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Josh Lindblom agrees to 3-year deal with Brewers

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Right-hander Josh Lindblom, who spent the past two seasons pitching in South Korea, is in agreement on a deal with the Milwaukee Brewers, sources tell ESPN’s Jeff Passan.

Lindblom’s contract will be for three years and guarantee $9.125 million, according to a source. With performance bonuses, it can max out at more than $18 million.

Lindblom has not pitched in the majors since 2017 with the Pirates. Prior to that, his last appearance was in 2014 with the A’s as he also pitched in South Korea’s KBO League in 2015 and ’16.

Lindblom spent the past two years with the Doosan Bears, going a combined 35-7. This past year, he went 20-3 with a 2.50 ERA and a 0.997 WHIP in 30 starts covering 194 2/3 innings.

He has also pitched for the Rangers, Phillies and Dodgers.

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Investigation into Astros’ sign-stealing allegations ongoing, Rob Manfred says

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SAN DIEGO — MLB commissioner Rob Manfred shared details about the extent of the league’s investigation into sign-steal allegations regarding the Houston Astros on Wednesday, but did not offer a timeline for when the result of the probe, and its consequences, will be known.

“I think that this is probably the most thorough investigation that the commissioner’s office has ever undertaken,” Manfred said. “We’ve interviewed already nearly 60 witnesses, (read) 76,000 e-mails, a whole additional trove of instant messages. That review has caused us to conclude that we have to do some follow-up interviewing.”

For now, the process is ongoing.

“It is my hope to conclude the investigation just as promptly as possible,” Manfred said. “But it’s really hard to predict how long something like that is going to take.”

The investigation was launched after former Astros pitcher Mike Fiers told the Athletic that the 2017 Houston club, for which he played and which won the World Series, used video from a live camera feed to steal catchers’ signs, and that someone in the dugout would hit a trash can to communicate the pitch type to batters in real time.

The scope of the inquiry has since expanded, and Manfred said it’s too soon to discuss the possible penalties stemming from investigators’ conclusions.

“At this point in the investigation it would be wholly inappropriate for me to speculate about what types of discipline might be in play,” Manfred said. “I’m going to get all the facts in front of me and make a decision as promptly as possible on discipline, and obviously you all will know about it as soon as it happens.”

Other items from Manfred’s 26-minute session with the media:

• Manfred confirmed that the 2020 draft will be held in Omaha, Neb., and for the first time will not overlap with the College World Series. Next year’s date for the first day of the draft will be moved from June 8 to June 10. The hope is to improve the draft-day experience for the top players selected, while also generating more interest in the draft in general.

• Rule changes such as the new three-batter minimum for pitchers, limits to roster options such as the number of pitchers a team can carry, and changes to the minimum length of injured list stays are expected to “be operational in the 2020 season.”

Specifically, Manfred confirmed that the injured list for pitchers would revert to 15 days from 10, and that pitchers optioned to the minors would have to spend 15 days there before being recalled. Active rosters would increase by one to 26 from opening day through Aug. 31, and would drop from 40 to 28 from Sept. 1 through the regular-season finale.

• As he has previously stated, Manfred downplayed the notion that MLB has made a firm decision to contract the minor leagues by a reported 42 teams. The agreement between MLB and minor-league baseball expires on Sept. 15, 2020, and the public tenor of the dialogue between the two sides has been contentious.

“The fact of the matter is at the point in time this became public, we had precisely three negotiating sessions. It is by no means a fait accompli as to what the agreement is going to look like,” Manfred said.

• Manfred said that he is not in favor of switching to a synthetically-produced baseballs in an effort to reduce variability in performance from ball to ball.

“I would not, am not now, and would not be in favor of moving away from the baseball that has traditionally been used to play what I regard to be the greatest game in the world. I think the variability in the baseball is a product of the fact that it is a man-made product with natural materials. I think that’s part of the charm of the game.”

• Manfred said that the New York Mets have followed league guidelines during their proposed sale process which would transfer control of the team from the Wilpon family to Steve Cohen.

“I do not expect that there will be any governance issues associated with the plan that they have in place for the transition of the Mets. It’s a pretty standard-looking transaction in terms of path-to-control and transition.”

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